Restoration of Brottsjø 7

This week we removed the “egnerhus”. There are parts from different periods, from the 1960 to the ’90. Under the glass fiber roof cover, probably from the 70’s we found small nails indicating that there was originally a canvas cover on the wooden roof. The sink and poorly made table are from the 90’s and have to go. When Brottsjø was used for fishing there was also a second stove standing in the “egnerhus” used for cooking and drying cloth, you can still see the round hole.

Click here if you want to read the Introduction/first post.

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Restoration of Brottsjø 5

Click here if you want to read the Introduction/first post.


This week we started taking away the old “skandekk”, that is the construction at the side of the deck that prevents water that’s coming from the deck to leak in-between the ribs and so in parts of the boat that you can’t inspect and thus potentially can cause serious damage. Another important function of the “skandekk” is preventing the deck to get wider and wider, the way we make these decks water tight is by forcing hemp into the different seams between the planks, by doing this you create enormous forces sideways and the ” skandekk” stops these. At this picture you see how I check if the deck is straight or slightly curved. The “randplank” between the straight deck and the curved “skandekk” gets special attention because of its shape.

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Restoration of Brottsjø 3

Click here if you want to read the Introduction/first post.


Brottsjø in the sliphall. I made fixed points in the slip hall and use these as a reverence for the grid you see here on the boat. The grid can help to position the different parts of the boat later when we start rebuilding the boat. This is one of the new things we use on this project, in the past a reference point sometimes got lost because it was taken away, like a stem.

Continue reading “Restoration of Brottsjø 3”

Restoration of Brottsjø

Almost 10 Years ago I worked for the Nordnorsk Fartøyvernsenter og Båtmuseum in Gratangen Norway as a wooden boat builder. There are three of these “fartøyvernsenter”, (boat preservation center) in Norway, two are specialized in restoring wooden boats and one is specialized in steel or iron boats.

I started working in Gratangen in 2006 as a boat builder and in 2010 I was responsible as project manager for the Restoration of Brottsjø together with the help of the other experienced boat builders. Because my Norwegian writing skills were not good enough I started a blog where I wrote in English and kept a relative detailed rapport on what I was doing on a weekly basis.

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Torgunn Katrine

For the last 3 years I have worked for a coastal museum in Rørvik (Kystmuseet Norveg). I restore old wooden buildings that are part of the collection and I also restore Torgunn Katrine, a 40ft wooden fishing boat from 1936. The pictures you see here are from that project. It is a small museum with only two craftsmen. My colleague restores mainly buildings and I do most of the work on the boats we have. Torgunn is a big project of at least 4000-man hours. I have a student and some temporary help and if everything goes well we will be ready next summer. I will tell more in an upcoming post.

Here is a link to the website of the museum where I work: kystmuseetnorveg

Video from 2016 about Torgunn Katrine

Some more recent pictures.

Some fancy pictures.

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