The antichrist

Der Antichrist

The Antichrist (German: Der Antichrist) is a book by the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, originally published in 1895. Although it was written in 1888, its controversial content made Franz Overbeck and Heinrich Köselitz delay its publication, along with Ecce Homo. The German title can be translated into English as either The Anti-Christ or The Anti-Christian, depending on how the German word Christ is translated. (Wiki)

Text from this book:

This book belongs to the most rare of men. Perhaps not one of them is yet alive. It is possible that they may be among those who understand my “Zarathustra”: how could I confound myself with those who are now sprouting ears?—First the day after tomorrow must come for me. Some men are born posthumously.
The conditions under which any one understands me, and necessarily understands me—I know them only too well. Even to endure my seriousness, my passion, he must carry intellectual integrity to the verge of hardness. He must be accustomed to living on mountain tops—and to looking upon the wretched gabble of politics and nationalism as beneath him. He must have become indifferent; he must never ask of the truth whether it brings profit to him or a fatality to him…. He must have an inclination, born of strength, for questions that no one has the courage for; the courage for the forbidden; predestination for the labyrinth. The experience of seven solitudes. New ears for new music. New eyes for what is most distant. A new conscience for truths that have hitherto remained unheard. And the will to economize in the grand manner—to hold together his strength, his enthusiasm…. Reverence for self; love of self; absolute freedom of self….
Very well, then! of that sort only are my readers, my true readers, my readers foreordained: of what account are the rest?—The rest are merely humanity.—One must make one’s self superior to humanity, in power, in loftiness of soul,—in contempt.
Friedrich W. Nietzsche.


Synopsis

The Anti-Christ back coverFriedrich Nietzsche’s “The Antichrist” might be more aptly named “The Antichristian,” for it is an unmitigated attack on Christianity that Nietzsche makes within the text instead of an exposition on evil or Satan as the title might suggest. In “The Antichrist,” Nietzsche presents a highly controversial view of Christianity as a damaging influence upon western civilization that must come to an end. Regardless of ones religious or philosophical point of view, “The Antichrist” makes for an engaging philosophical discourse.

The Anti-Christ is a work originally published in 1895 and written by philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. This is a book which is seen as an assault by Nietzsche on the institution of Christianity and focuses on the “slave morality” and the apathy of Western Christianity. Believeing that Christianity is a poinoner, the author uses a systematic and detailed attack upon the popular interpretation of Christ’s words by St. Paul and his followers. This edition also features an introduction written by H. L. Mencken. The Anti-Christ is highly recommended for those who are interested in the religious beliefs of Friedrich Nietzsche and also those who enjoy his writings.

The Anti-Christ back cover2Here is Friedrich Nietzsche’s great masterpiece The Anti-Christ, wherein Nietzsche attacks Christianity as a blight on humanity. This classic is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand Nietzsche and his place within the history of philosophy. “We should not deck out and embellish Christianity: it has waged a war to the death against this higher type of man, it has put all the deepest instincts of this type under its ban, it has developed its concept of evil, of the Evil One himself, out of these instincts-the strong man as the typical reprobate, the ‘outcast among men.’ Christianity has taken the part of all the weak, the low, the botched; it has made an ideal out of antagonism to all the self-preservative instincts of sound life; it has corrupted even the faculties of those natures that are intellectually most vigorous, by representing the highest intellectual values as sinful, as misleading, as full of temptation. The most lamentable example: the corruption of Pascal, who believed that his intellect had been destroyed by original sin, whereas it was actually destroyed by Christianity!” -Friedrich Nietzsche

Nietzsche claimed in the Foreword to have written the book for a very limited readership. In order to understand the book, he asserted that the reader “… must be honest in intellectual matters to the point of hardness to so much as endure my seriousness, my passion.” The reader should be above politics and nationalism. Also, the usefulness or harmfulness of truth should not be a concern. Characteristics such as “Strength which prefers questions for which no one today is sufficiently daring; courage for the forbidden” are also needed. He disdained all other readers.


Reading The antichrist

Read it here at archive.org or download the PDF here The antichrist

The Anti-Christ2